Tag Archives: Julia Nathanson

Julia Nathanson and Mariko Hino

Just before I went on vacation, while I was doing the Research Point 2 exercise for part 5 of the course, I looked briefly at two photographers who photographed alleys and mentioned that I would do a proper write up on them once I returned.

Julia Nathanson is a Canadian photographer from Toronto. She attended New York Film Academy and has won numerous awards for her mobile photography, been published in Hipstography, The App Whisperer, and National Geographic and has won numerous awards including Hipstography’s Street Series of the Year in 2014 and 2015, and the Mobile Photo Grand Prize at PhotoIndependent in 2016.

Her series In the Lane features brightly saturated images of scenarios in the alleys of Toronto and various found ephemera she comes across. What stands out for me is the work is all about colour – blues and oranges/orange and green/red, blue and green/bright reds and blues … I don’t actually have a cell phone but I can see that some filters have been applied to some of her images, which enhance the colours.

I find her work playful, almost like a child’s colouring in book and it just makes me feel rather happy, even if one is viewing rather dingy items.

From In the Lane series by Julia Nathanson

In contrast, Mariko Hino’s work Restore, also featured on LensCulture, is more serious, inviting contemplation. While zooming in and focusing more on the details found in the alleys, her overall colour palette is more subdued and the images more ambiguous. Hino is from Tokyo and received the Ryo Owada Award for her work in the ‘Heart Art Communication Best Artist Exhibition’ held at the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum.

Restore – 9 by Mariko Hino

It is so interesting to see that similar subject matter can be tackled basically from the opposite ends of the spectrum.

Reference List

Hino, Mariko (n.d.) Mariko Hino [online] LensCulture. Available at: https://www.lensculture.com/mariko-hino [Accessed 9 August, 2017]

Nathanson, Julia (n.d.) In the Lane [online] Julian Nathanson Photography. Available at: http://www.julianathanson.com/in-the-lane/ [Accessed 9 August, 2017]

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Research Point 2

The brief:

Do your own research into areas you’ve been inspired by in this project; delve deeper into the areas that interest you. Continue to think about how this might inform your own practice.

I have to admit I am not a particular fan of still life photography and I would have to clarify that I’m talking about a staged/table top arrangement, be it rhopography, xenion or the meal on the table type of photography. I am however, drawn to found objects or arrangements that happen “naturally” for example Nigel Shafran’s Washing Up series, Richard Wentworth and Elliott Wilcox’s works, as well as that of Susan Lipper. I probably chime best of all with Wentworth’s work.

Blue warehouse – alley view by Lynda Kuit (2017)

I have over the past few years discovered that I do have a strange fascination for alleys and can see myself exploring this area in more depth when I do the landscape module. The objects, signs and colours that can be found in alleys are in a world of their own and totally different to what is on view to the general public from the road. The dilapidated fences, overgrown vegetation, moss covered roofs and discarded objects placed in the alley provide such interesting narratives. I did do a brief exploration into some alleys at the start of this module in the Square Mile exercise.

Gallery steps by Lynda Kuit, 2017

Julia Nathanson (a Canadian photographer) also is quite fascinated by laneways/alleys and I can really relate to her images because we are in the same country. The similarities to what she sees on the eastern side of the country to what I see on the western side are very prevalent. Her In the Lanes project can be seen here featured on LensCulture.  Another photographer photographing the back end of properties is Mariko Hino, a Japanese photographer, also featured on LensCulture. I’ll do a more in-depth write up on these two artists when I return from vacation.

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